African/African American Resources

  • Rondo Days

    Posted by Alyse Burnside at 6/13/2016 4:00:00 PM

    Don't Miss Rondo Days, 2016!

    Commemorate St. Paul's most historic African American neighborhood, Rondo, in celebrating their 33rd annual Rondo Days street festival. Learn more about Rondo Days and the Rondo Community on their website: http://rondoavenueinc.org/rondo-days-2016/

     

    photo courtesy of Rondo Community Website

    Photo Credit: http://rondoavenueinc.org/rondo-days-2016/

     

    To see how SPPS is commemorating Rondo, check out this article about Capitol Hill Magnet's "History of Rondo" art installation. 

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