Select a School...
Select a School

Ann Eaton Johnson, Principal

2180 Knapp Street, Saint Paul, MN 55108

(651) 293-8735 | Get Directions

Principal/School Name

360 Colborne Street, Saint Paul, MN, 55102

651-767-8100 | Get Directions

Banner Image

Social Studies

Ms. Maas
  • Hello,

    My name is Roni Maas and this is my third year teaching at St. Anthony Park. This is my second year as a Social Studies teacher and I am loving it! I have been teaching in St. Paul Public Schools since 1992. I am a 1984 graduate and proud alumni of St. Paul Johnson, born and raised on the East Side. I received my undergraduate degree at the University of Wisconsin in River Falls and my Masters degree from Concordia University in St. Paul. When I am not teaching I coach figure skating. My proudest moment was when one of my skaters won a regional competition on her birthday placing first out of 16 competitors!

    I look forward to another wonderful, funfilled year at St. Anthony Park. 

    ronnie.maas@spps.org

     
     
  • Kindergarten Social Studies

    Citizenship and Government

    UNIT 1 - Our School Community

    Students will identify examples of rules in the school and community and explain why they exist; describe incentives for following rules and consequences for breaking them.

    UNIT 2 - I am part of this class

    Students will demonstrate civic skills in a classroom that reflects and understanding of civic values.

    UNIT 3 - Civic Skills and Civic Values; Symbols, Songs and Traditions

    Students will be able to describe symbols, songs, and traditions that identify our nation and state.

    Economics

    UNIT 4 - Wants and Needs

    In this unit students will be able to distinguish between individual wants (conditions desired to make you happy) and needs (conditions necessary for survival).

    UNIT 5 - Goods and Services

    Students will be able to identify goods (wants and needs items that can be touched or seen) and services (actions provided by another person either paid or volunteer)

    Geography

    UNIT 6 - Location

    Students wll be able to identify relative location using vocabulary words such as: front, back , near, far, left, right, up, down, behind, in front of, over and under.

    UNIT 7 - How to describe a place

    Students will be identifying physical and human characteristics of places, including real and imaginary.

     

    First Grade Social Studies

    UNIT 1 - Democratic Values and Principles

    In this unit, students will expand their foundational knowledge of democratic values and principles. Emphasis will be put on participatory skills as well as civic rituals and customs of the United States. They will learn how symbols and rituals, such as the Flag of the United States and the Pledge of Allegiance, help shape American civic identity. The Panorama lessons begin with a read-aloud of Humphrey the Lost Whale. They will learn about civic participation and create a “map” expressing the meaning of community. The following lesson will introduce students to the meaning of the flag and basic flag etiquette. The final lesson will look at the meaning of the Pledge of Allegiance and the practice of reciting it. This unit will provide skills and knowledge needed for future units on voting and ways to live a civic life.

    UNIT 2 - RULES AND LAWS

    In this unit, students will increase their foundational knowledge of civic institutions. Emphasis will be put on rule making and popular sovereignty. They will know what makes rules effective and participate in a process to establish them. They will also be introduced to the idea of voting and that the vote of the majority determines who will be the president of the United States. Students begin the Panorama unit by brainstorming how rules are important in daily life. They will follow with a read-aloud of Library Lion and a discussion on what makes a good rule. Students will then practice the skills they need to make them effective in a group discussion. Through a read-aloud of Grace for President, they will learn that a political candidate works to represent voters' ideas. They will compare both candidates from the story and create a campaign poster. This unit will provide the foundation for future units on rules, rights, responsibilities, and the three branches of government.

    UNIT 3 - SCARCITY AND ECONOMIC CHOICES

    In this unit, students will explore foundational concepts in economics. Emphasis will be put on factors that influence economic decisions. Students will examine the concept of scarcity and be able to recognize instances where scarcity occurs. The Panorama lessons begin with a reading of Monster Musical Chairs. Students will be introduced and discuss the concept of scarcity. In the following lesson, students follow up with a game of musical chairs and explore how it relates to their wants of goods and services. Students are able, in the following lesson, to reflect and understand how these economic concepts apply to their lives through a writing/drawing activity. The final lesson looks at the story of the Three Little Pigs through a decision-making lens. This short lesson allows students to identify costs and benefits of decisions. The skills and knowledge acquired in this unit will prepare students to deepen their understanding of economic decision-making, opportunity cost and trade-off in 2nd grade.

    UNIT 4 - TRADE

    In this unit, students will be introduced to the idea of markets. Emphasis will be put on the concept of trade and the reasons people trade. Students will examine the concepts of specialization and interdependence that are behind trades of goods and services. 

    UNIT 5 - SPACE - Using maps to understand our space

    In this unit, students will keep building on their spatial awareness skills and knowledge of places around them and beyond. They will be introduced to basic geographic practices such as the creation of sketch maps, the description of spatial information found on maps, and the use of absolute or relative location. Students begin the Panorama unit by exploring the concept of models and the usefulness of maps and globes as miniature models of the earth. They follow with a two-part lesson on the language of location and use that knowledge when creating a map of their classroom. They conclude with an activity where they will to use the map for a scavenger hunt. The skills and knowledge of this unit will serve as a foundation for the 2ndgrade unit on physical and human features found on maps.

    UNIT 6 - PLACE - Characteristics of places

    In this unit, students will continue building on their knowledge of places and their characteristics. They will be able to define, describe, and compare places near and far by examining physical and human characteristics within them. In the Panorama unit, students will be introduced to the concept of place and construct its definition. In the following lesson, they will learn about natural and human characteristics of place by brainstorming how they manifest themselves in their community. The last lesson of the unit lets student explore how those characteristics compare with distant places. Students will create a poster comparing the natural and human features of a place in the United States chosen by the teacher. The skills and knowledge of this unit will be used for a deeper exploration of the concept of place in 2nd grade. 

    UNIT 7 - CULTURE AND PERSPECTIVES: DAILY LIFE THEN AND NOW

    UNIT 8 - HISTORICAL INQUIRY:MY TIMELINE

     
    Second Grade Social Studies

    UNIT 1 - Democratic Values and Principles

    In this unit, students will expand their foundational knowledge of democratic values and principles. Emphasis will be put on participating in a voting process. Students will learn that we rely on rules to keep the voting process fair and valid. They will also learn that voting rests on participatory skills learned in previous units. Skills, such as active listening, taking different perspectives into account, and critical thinking help shape informed and engaged citizens. The Panorama lessons begin with a basic voting activity that focuses on individual choices and informed decision. Then, students will participate in a more elaborate voting simulation and learn about the voting process and rules. The unit concludes with a read-aloud of Duck for President, where students will learn about the importance of voting and its connection to civic participation. This unit expands the students experience in civic participation and the skills learned in this unit will prepare students for learning about civic discourse in the next grade.

    UNIT 2 - RULES, RIGHTS, AND RESPONSIBILITIES

    In this unit, students will expand their foundational knowledge of civic institutions. Emphasis will be put on rules, rights, and responsibilities. Students will compare and contrast rules at school and rules at home and explain the importance of obeying rules. They will also understand the importance of constitutions, including the Constitution of the United States. The Panorama lessons begin with an activity where students brainstorm rules using the story of Humpty Dumpty.  They follow with a read-aloud of David Goes to School and compare & contrast rules at school and rules at home. A read-aloud of We the Kids will introduce students to the meaning of the Preamble of the Constitution. In the final lesson, students will illustrate what the ideas of the Constitution look like in their daily lives. The knowledge and skills learned in this unit will prepare them for understanding how and why the government is divided in three branches and how limits are put on each branch.

    UNIT 3 - SPENDING AND TRADE-OFFS

    In this unit, students will strengthen their foundational knowledge of economics. Emphasis will be put on a deeper understanding of the economic decision-making process. Students will explore how trade-offs and opportunity costs present themselves in economic decisions. The Panorama lessons begin with a review of the idea of scarcity and its influence on our choices. Students will explore the ide of economic decisions through the reading of Rosemary Wells’ Bunny Money. They follow up with an activity on saving goals. With My Rows and Piles of Coins, students will be introduced to the concept of Opportunity Cost and Trade off. They will apply these concepts in activities involving economic choices. The skills and knowledge acquired in this unit prepare students for 3rd grade examination of short- and long-term consequences of their economic decisions.

    UNIT 4 - RESOURCES AND THE ROLE OF MONEY

    In this unit, students will deepen their foundational knowledge of exchanges and markets. Emphasis will be put on the three productive resources and money. Students will examine different types of resources as well as how, and why, money became the most common (but not the only one) medium of exchange. The Panorama lessons begin with a look at natural, capital, and human resources. Students will read Little Nino’s Pizzeria and examine the resources needed in the production process. They will then learn to categorize resources independently. The following lesson looks at what money is. Students will read Sheep in a Shop and compare contrast bartering and using money. The following lesson extends the study of money and its role as a mean of exchanges. Students will simulate a shopping experience and understand the characteristics of money as a mean of exchange. The skills and knowledge acquired in this unit will prepare students for 3rd grade and the unit of the production process as well as the roles producers and consumers play in a market.

    UNIT 5 - SPACE - Mapping Stories, Describing Cardinal Directions

    In this unit, students will deepen their ability to interpret different types of maps. They learn about cardinal directions, explore a variety of spatial settings map can be drawn from, locate and use content specific vocabulary to describe maps. In the Panorama unit, students will use the compass rose and movement on a world map. They will need to use directional vocabulary in short writing prompts on the continents and oceans. In the next lessons, students will continue using geographic vocabulary and draw maps from stories they create. Skills and content acquired in this unit will be extended and consolidated in 3rd grade with the unit on maps and spatial thinking.

    UNIT 6 - PLACE- Understanding places with maps and geographic tools

    In this unit, students will use their knowledge of places and their characteristics to look at the distribution of human populations. They will use a variety of geographic tools and photos to understand where populations are located. Students will also begin exploring human interactions with the environment from a geographic perspective. In the Panorama unit, students will describe and locate out some natural and human landmarks of the United States from an animated video. They will be introduced to the concept of population by discussing and brainstorming possible reasons for crowding. The following lesson will invite them to compare crowded and uncrowded places and explain why some places are more crowded than others. The final activity will let them simulate an example of human-environment interactions. This unit will serve as a foundation for 3rd grade exploration of population and rivers in both Geography and History.

    UNIT 7 - CULTURE AND PERSPECTIVES: OUR COMMUNITY

    UNIT 8 - HISTORICAL INQUIRY: WHO ARE THE DAKOTA AND ANISHIAABE?

     
    Third Grade Social Studies

    UNIT 1 - Democratic Values and Principles

    In this unit, students will consolidate their foundational knowledge of democratic values and principles. Emphasis will be put civic life and civic discourse. Students will describe how people make a difference in civic life by addressing problems and needs either individually or as a group, and explain why civic discourse, majority rule and minority rights are important expressions of our civic values and principles. The Panorama lessons begin with a read-aloud of Ballot Box Battle where students will learn about Elizabeth Cady Stanton and her engagement for women’s right to vote. Students will then practice elements of civic discourse by simulating a political debate. The final two lessons will engage in a discussion on the meaning of majority rule and minority rights. The skills and knowledge acquired from this unit will serve as a foundation for future units on the creation of the American political system, taught in 5th grade.

    UNIT 2 - FUNCTIONS OF GOVERNMENT

    In this unit, students will consolidate their foundational knowledge of civic institutions. Emphasis will be put on the executive, the legislative, and the judicial branches of government and what they do. They will also explain that people’s taxes and fees fund important government services to communities. The Panorama lessons begin with a read-aloud of an informational text on government services. Students will play a bingo game and learn how government services impact their lives. The following lesson looks at taxes and fees that fund government services. Students learn about the many ways people pay taxes. The final lesson examines the three branches of government. Students simulate how all the branches function and work together. The skills and knowledge acquired in this unit will give students a solid foundation for further exploration of the American political system in grade 4 and 5.

    UNIT 3 - CONSEQUENCES OF OUR CHOICES

    In this unit, students will consolidate their foundational knowledge of economic decision-making. Emphasis will be put on how short- and long-term consequences of economic decisions express themselves. Students will use the knowledge and skills acquired in previous grades to be introduced to personal finances. The Panorama lessons begin with a look at consequences of economic decisions. Students read Uncle Jed’s Barbershop by Margaree King Mitchell and discuss the consequences of the character’s choices. Students explore consequences of decision-making in a card game activity. The following lessons introduce student to personal finances and what income is. Students read and discuss A Chair for My Mother by Vera B. Williams. The final lesson looks at how people use income. Students establish the connection between human resources and income and work on savings strategies. The skills and knowledge acquired in this unit will prepare students to understand the process of reasoned decision-making and further explorations of personal finance in grades 4 and 5.

    UNIT 4 - CONSUMING AND PRODUCING GOODS AND SERVICES

    In this unit, students will secure their foundational knowledge of exchanges and markets. Emphasis will be put on how resources are used to produce goods and services and how they are exchanged between producers and consumers. Students are introduced to the reasons for choosing to produce a limited amount of goods and services and the dual role of producers and consumers. The Panorama lessons begin with a look at the production process. Students will read and discuss Goat in the Rug by Charles L. Blood and Martin Link. In the following activity, they play a matching game and make posters to classify productive resources. The final lessons explore the interaction of producers and consumers. Students will create a classroom market simulation that focuses on how prices are established and the relationship between producers and consumers. The skills and knowledge acquired in this unit will serve as a foundation to further study of markets and concepts of productivity in 4th grade and profit in 5th grade

    UNIT 5 - SPACE - Reading and making maps for spatial thinking

    In this unit, students will consolidate their abilities to use geographic tools and think spatially. They will look at maps of places in Minnesota and across the world. Students will be able to interpret spatial information and map symbols. The Panorama unit is based on activities from the Food for Thought curriculum. In the first lesson, students will learn to use content-specific vocabulary to read and describe maps. In the next lesson. In the next lesson, students will make a simple map of the world and include “TODALS” map basics and spatial information. Knowledge and skills acquired in this unit will serve as a foundation for future units in Ancient Civilization in 3rd grade, on Minnesota agriculture in 4th grade, and the Slave Trade in 5th grade Early American History.

    UNIT 6 - PLACE - Populations and Geographic Features

    In this unit, students will consolidate their understanding of landforms, human population settlements, and be introduced to the concept of boundaries. They will explore the relationship between different types of landforms and human settlement patterns Students will then examine boundaries and their function as a marker of identity. The Panorama unit begins with a look at where major bodies of water are and identify the location of cities along them. Students will discuss why cities are located where they are. In the next lesson, students will explore settlement patterns using a nighttime map. They will write a short informational paragraph on the reasons for the density of the population, using the map as evidence for their argument. The last lesson looks at boundaries with a short activity on the concept of boundary and its function. Students will draw boundaries on maps and explain the reasons for their thinking. They will learn that boundaries can be physical (mountains and rivers) or cultural (religion, language). The knowledge and skills from this unit will lead to an understanding of human settlement in Ancient Civilization Units in grade 3, North American Geography in grade 4, and Early American History in grade 5.

    UNIT 7 - CULTURES AND PERSPECTIVES: CIVILIZATION, COMMUNICATION, AND DAILY LIFE IN ANCIENT TIMES

    UNIT 8 - HISTORICAL INQUIRY: WHAT ARE THE ELEMENTS OF CULTURE

     

    Fourth Grade Social Studies

    UNIT 1 - THINKING LIKE A GEOGRAPHER

    Students learn why the study of the social sciences is important to understanding human behavior. In a Response Group activity, they discuss artifacts from the perspective of each of these social science traditions: economics, grography, political science, and history.

    UNIT 2 - EXPLORING REGIONS OF THE UNITED STATES

    Students apply basic map skills to learn about the regions of the United States. In a social Studies Skill Builder, they interpret a series of special purpose maps depicting five regions of the United States and atempt to identify the locations where the five images were taken.

    UNIT 3 - THE PEOPLING OF THE UNITED STATES

    Students learn how five ethnic groups-American Indians, Latinos, European Americans, African Americans, and Asian Americans-came to this country and contributed to its growth and development.

    UNIT 4 - A TRAIN TOUR OF THE NORTHEAST

    In a Writing for Understanding activity, groups of students sit on a "train" and listen to a tour guide while they view images of places in the Northeast. Through interactive experiences, they learn key concepts and facts about the Northeast.

    UNIT 5 - POPULATION DENSITY AND LIFE IN THE NORTHEAST

    Students learn how population density in the Northeast affects the lives of the people who live there. In an Experiential Exercise, students use their bodies and desks to simulate the population density of the Northeast and several comparative locales.

    UNIT 6 - A BOAT AND BUS TOUR OF THE SOUTHEAST

    In a Writing for Understanding activity, students listen to a tour guide and view images depicting life in the Southeast. The bus and boat tour stops at three sites, where students engage in interactive experiences and learn key concepts and facts about the region of the United States.

    UNIT 7 - THE EFFECTS ON GEOGRAPHY ON LIFE IN THE SOUTHEAST

    In a Social Studies Skill Builder, students look at maps and answer questions about climate, elevation, natural resources, and bodies of water. Then, they hypothesize and read about the effects of geography on life in the Southeast.

    UNIT 8 - A CROP DUSTER TOUR OF THE MIDWEST

    Students tour the Midwest region of the United States. In a Writing for Understanding activity, they listen to a tour guide and view images of the Midwest. Through interactive experiences, students learn key concepts and facts about the region.

    UNIT 9 - AGRICULTURAL CHANGES IN THE MIDWEST

    Students learn how agriculture in the Midwest changed from 1800 to today. In a Visual Discovery activity, they analyze images of farm life in 1800, 1900, and today. Then they create act-it-outs to demonstrate their understanding of farm life during these periods.

    UNIT 10 - A BIG RIG TOUR OF THE SOUTHWEST

    Students take a "big rig" tour of the Southwest region of the United States. They sit in "big rigs" in groups of three, listen to a tour guide, and view nine images depicting life in the Southwest. The trucks stop at three sites, where students learn more through interactive experiences.

    UNIT 11 - A CASE STUDY IN WATER USE : THE COLORADO RIVER

    Students explore the history of how people have used and shared the water of the Colorado River.

    UNIT 12 - A VAN AND AIRPLANE TOUR OF THE WEST

    Students take a "van and airplane tour" of the West region of the United States. Students listen to a tour guide and view nine images of places in the West. The tour stops at three sites, where students learn more through interactive experiences that teach key concepts of the lesson.

    UNIT 13 - CITIES OF THE WEST

    Students learn about seven cities in the West in a Problem Solving Groupwork activity. They research, plan, and perform television commercials about cities in the West.

    UNIT 14 - RESEARCHING YOUR STATE'S GEOGRAPHY

    Students research the geography of their state using maps, atlases, library books, and the Internet. Then, pairs of students design a board game that includes the geographic features they identified and then take turns playing each other's games.

    UNIT 15 - RESEARCHING YOUR STATE'S HISTORY

    Students learn how to investigate their state's history by researching a building, creating a model of the building, writing a script that tells about one era in the state's history from the perspective of the building, and bringing the building to life to tell the story of their state's history.

    UNIT 16 - RESEARCHING YOUR STATE'S ECONOMY

    Students learn how to understand their state's economy. They work in groups to research one of eight economic activities and then create a museum exhibit about that activity. Each figure in the exhibit "comes to life" to talk about the essential aspects of the state's economy.

    UNIT 17 - RESEARCHING YOUR STATE'S GOVERNMENT

    In a Writing for Understanding activity, students play a game to learn the sequence of a state's legislative process. After researching their state's government, they write a letter to a state leader asking that he or she help solve a problem by working to get a new law passed.

    UNIT 18 - STUDY YOUR STATE

    In a Writing for Understanding activity, students play a game to learn the sequence of a state's legislative process. After researching their state's government, they write a letter to a state leader asking that he or she help solve a problem by working to get a new law passed.

    UNIT 19 - MAPPING LAB: LATIN AMERICA

    In this Mapping Lab, students work in pairs to complete a series of geography challenges that spiral in difficulty.

    UNIT 20 - MEXICO CITY BUS TOUR

    In this activity, students take a “bus tour” of Mexico City and then write a letter describing what they learned. In groups of three, students listen to a tour guide and view images depicting four aspects of life in Mexico City—history, culture, neighborhoods, and environment.

    UNIT 21 - MAPPING LAB: CANADA AND THE UNITED STATES

    In this Mapping Lab, students work in pairs to complete a series of geography challenges that spiral in difficulty.

    UNIT 22 - WAYS OF LIFE IN CANADA

    In this lesson, students explore how location influences life in the varied regions of Canada.

     
    Fifth Grade Social Studies

    UNIT 1 - GEOGRAPHY OF THE UNITED STATES

     Students explore the difference between relative and absolute locations. In a Social Studies Skill Builder, students work at tables to label features on maps and a diagram. They define geographic terms and apply them to the geography of the United States.

    UNIT 2 - AMERICAN INDIANS AND THEIR LAND

    Students learn why the first people migrated to North America and how they adapted to the different environments they encountered. Students work in small groups to trace migrations routes of the first Americans and summarize how these groups adapted to different environments.

    UNIT 3 - AMERICAN INDIAN CULTURAL REGIONS

    Students learn about seven American Indian cultural regions and the cultural adaptations made by the groups to the environments in each region. Students analyze historical artifacts from different American Indian groups and compare and contrast life in the various regions. Students will present a final group project the week before  the Thanksgiving break on a specific American Indian tribe and their region. This project will be due the week of November 21.

    UNIT 4 - HOW AN WHY EUROPEANS CAME TO THE NEW WORLD

    Students learn about European explorers who claimed land in North America from the late 1400s through the 1600s. Students use an illustrated classroom matrix to organize information about each explorer and play a game, answering questions about the explorers.

    UNIT 5 - ROUTES OF EXPLORATION TO THE NEW WORLD

     Students learn about European explorers who claimed land in North America from the late 1400s through the 1600s. Students use an illustrated classroom matrix to organize information about each explorer and then play a game in which they answer questions about the explorers

    UNIT 6 - EARLY ENGLISH SETTLEMENTS

    In a Visual Discovery activity, students analyze images of Roanoke, Jamestown, and Plymouth to create act-it-outs that show why settlers came, the hardships they endured, and the reasons why each settlement succeeded or failed.

    UNIT 7 - COMPARING THE COLONIES

    Students learn about the similarities and differences among the New England, Middle, and Southern colonies. They create a billboard for one of the colonies and try to persuade others to settle in their colony. Afterward, students read about the six colonies and evaluate each group's claims.

    UNIT 8 - FACING SLAVERY

    Students learn about the choices West Africans had to make to survive being enslaved and brought to the Americas. Student groups analyze and respond to the dilemmas faced by Africans during enslavement: trading slaves for guns, surviving the Middle Passage, and living as a slave in the colonies.

    UNIT 9 - LIFE IN COLONIAL WILIAMSBURG

    Students take a "walking tour" of Williamsburg to learn about daily life in the colonial Virginia capital. Then, students visit six stations representing sites in colonial Williamsburg to examine aspects of colonial life.

    UNIT 10 - TENSIONS GROW BETWEEN THE COLONIES AND GREAT BRITAIN

    Students compare the tense relationship between the colonies and Great Britain before the American Revolution to a strained relationship between a parent and a child.

    UNIT 11 - TO DECLARE INDEPENDENCE OR NOT

    Students learn about six prominent colonists, who are either Loyalists or Patriots, and record these leaders' viewpoints about American independence. In a Problem Solving Groupwork activity, groups represent the historical figures in a panel debate.

     UNIT 12 - The Declaration of Independence

    Students examine objects on Thomas Jefferson's desk, such as a letter and an invitation, to learn about the events and ideas that led to Jefferson's drafting of the Declaration of Independence.

    UNIT 13 - THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

    Students analyze how the American colonies defeated Great Britain in the American Revolution. In an Experiential Exercise, students engage in a tug-of-war that demonstrates factors that helped the American colonies win the American Revolution.

    UNIT 14 - THE CONSTITUTION

    Students compare the government set up by the Constitution to a three-legged stool to learn how the government is a strong and balanced.

    UNIT 15 - THE BILL OF RIGHTS

    Students learn about the Bill of Rights and several of its key amendments. In an Experiential Exercise, students work in small groups to create tableaux vivants, or living scenes, to represent key amendments in the Bill of Rights.

    UNIT 16 - MANIFEST DESTINY AND SETTLING THE WEST

    Students learn about U.S. expansion into the West in the 1800s and how this affected those peoples who had already made their homes there

    UNIT 17 - THE DIVERSE PEOPLES OF THE WEST

    Students learn about the lives of six groups of people who lived in or moved to the West in the 1800s and how these groups were helped or harmed by the westward expansion of the United States.

    UNIT 18 - THE CAUSES OF THE CIVIL WAR

    Students learn about key events that led to the Civil War and use a metaphor to compare prewar events with a story about a brother and sister who disagree. Then students complete an illustrated storybook to reflect the growing tensions between the North and the South.

    UNIT 19 - THE CIVIL WAR

    Students learn about the experiences of Union and Confederate soldiers during the Civil War. In a Writing for Understanding activity, students take a "walking tour" to visit five sites at the battlefield at Gettysburg in July 1863.

    UNIT 20 - INDUSTRIALIZATION AND THE MODERN UNITED STATES

    Students learn about seven key historical periods since the Civil War that have changed life in the United States. They work in pairs to create an illustrated timeline of modern American history. Then they play a card game to better understand the importance of these eras in today's U.S.

Maps Maps Maps

CLOSE