Top Skills Employers are Looking For

  • The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) ran a survey asking hiring managers what skills they plan to prioritize when they recruit from the class of 2015.  Here is what they found:

    The three college degrees most in demand were business, engineering, and computer and information sciences.

    Top ten skills employers seek, in order of importance.

    1. Ability to work in a team structure
    2. Ability to make decisions and solve problems
    3. Ability to communicate verbally with people inside and outside an organization
    4. Ability to plan, organize and prioritize work
    5. Ability to obtain and process information
    6. Ability to analyze quantitative data
    7. Technical knowledge related to the job
    8. Proficiency with computer software programs
    9. Ability to create and/or edit written reports
    10. Ability to sell and influence others

     The classes you will find within the Career and Technical Education Program (CTE) can help you develop and sharpen the skills listed above.

Why CTE?

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    High-Quality CTE Programs

    The elements of high-quality CTE programs include:

    • Standards-aligned and Integrated Curriculum: development of CTE program curriculum and standards.
    • Integrated Network of Partnerships: business and community partnerships to support CTE program alignment and success.
    • Course Sequencing and Credentials: coordination of coursework progression in CTE programs and career pathways that lead to recognized postsecondary credentials.
    • Career-Connected Learning and Experiential Learning: career planning and career-based experiential learning opportunities.
    • Industry-specific Facilities, Equipment, Technology and Materials: facilities and equipment specific to work in given career fields.
    • Work-Based Learning (WBL): firsthand, onsite student engagement opportunities in a given career field.
    • Data for Program Improvement and Advocacy: use of data for continuous program improvement and advocacy.
    • Student Leadership Development: leadership development through embedded classroom activities and CTSO opportunities.
    • Access, Equity and Inclusion: CTE program promotion and support for all student populations.
    • Student-Centered Instruction: instructional strategies that support attainment of career-relevant knowledge and skills.
    • Professional Development for Knowledgeable Experts: qualifications and professional development of secondary CTE teachers.

    Did you know

    • The high school graduation rate for Minnesota students who are CTE concentrators (enrolled in two or more CTE courses) is 92%.
    • Nearly two-thirds (65%) of Minnesota high school CTE concentrators enroll in postsecondary for further education and career development.
    • In Minnesota, 86% of postsecondary students completing a CTE program were placed in employment by the end of the second quarter following program completion.
    • Nearly two-thirds (65%) of jobs will require some postsecondary training and/or education beyond high school.