Multiple SPPS Student Groups Graduate at Higher Rates than Statewide Peers

  • Published by Saint Paul Public Schools April 23, 2019

    The four-year graduation rate for the Saint Paul Public Schools class of 2018 reached 74.9 percent, with multiple student groups surpassing the state average.

    Additionally, several high schools had graduation rates of 80 percent or higher for all students, including Central Senior, Highland Park Senior, Johnson Senior, Open World Learning Community and Washington Technology Magnet.

    "Graduation rates are a key component of our SPPS Achieves Strategic Plan," said Joe Gothard, SPPS Superintendent. "I’m pleased that many schools exceeded the state average again this year.

    We must also maintain and intensify efforts to ensure all student groups are prepared for college and career."

    SPPS Four-Year Graduation Rate FourYearGradRates

    According to data released today by the Minnesota Department of Education, graduation rate highlights for SPPS include:

    • American Indian students posted a gain of 9.37 percentage points.
    • American Indian students, Hispanic students, Black students, English learners, students experiencing homelessness and students eligible for free or reduced-price meals had higher graduation rates than the state average for the same student groups.
    • Highland Park Senior had the highest overall graduation rate in the district at 90.9 percentage points.
    • Overall, the highest graduation rate for student groups in SPPS were White students at 83.7 percent, and Asian students at 78.3 percent.
  • SPPS to State Comparisons

    The class of 2018 surpassed the state average in multiple student groups and at specific schools.

     

    Student Groups

    StudentGroups2

    Schools: All StudentsSchools


     

2018 Graduation Rates

Four-Year Graduation Rate

  • The MDE 4-Year Graduation Rate is defined and used by the state for accountability purposes.

    This formula counts the number of students graduating from high school within four years after entering grade nine, as a percent of all students who graduated, dropped out, are continuing high school, or have an unknown outcome. Students who transferred into the district are included in this calculation; those who transferred out are not.


  • Note: Change in Calculations

    Graduation results reflect the Minnesota Department of Education’s (MDE) revisions to its graduation calculation that were first introduced for 2017 rates. This is related to its implementation of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). For comparisons, MDE has applied the changes retroactively to previous years going back to the class of 2012.

    Graduation rates using the previous calculation (prior to February 2018) should no longer be used. Additionally, comparisons between the previous calculation (prior to February 2018) and the current calculation are not appropriate.